How theoretical particle physicists made history with the Standard Model (Vol. 49, No. 1)

Luciano Maiani, Pucci de Stefano, and their child Camilla at the Theory Division picnic, CERN 1985

The personal recollections of a physicist involved in developing a reference model in particle physics, called the Standard Model, particularly in Italy.

Understanding the Universe requires first understanding its building blocks, a field covered by particle physics. Over the years, an elegant model of particle physics, dubbed the Standard Model, has emerged as the main point of reference for describing the fundamental components of matter and their interactions. The Standard Model is not confined to particle physics; it also provides us a guide to understanding phenomena that take place in the Universe at large, down to the first moments of the Big Bang, and it sets the stage for a novel cosmic problem, namely the identification of dark matter. Placing the Standard Model in a historical context sheds valuable light on how the theory came to be. In a remarkable paper published recently, Luciano Maiani shares his personal recollections with Luisa Bonolis. During an interview recorded over several days in March 2016, Maiani outlines the role of those researchers who were instrumental in the evolution of theoretical particle physics in the years when the Standard Theory was developed.

L. Maiani and L. Bonolis, The Charm of Theoretical Physics (1958-1993) Oral History Interview, Eur. Phys. J. H, (2017)